Sunday, June 21, 2009

rejected

14"x 18" Oil on board
"The Other Door," A recent oil painting that was rejected by the big local show. This has happened twice now, I've taken in 2 paintings on 2 separate years that I thought were pretty good. I figured at worst one would be taken but no such luck.
I liked this one. It was actually a very relaxing process, working from a photo we took in Venice it was nice to just paint what was in front of me with no real difficult decisions beyond value and color. I thought the composition was interesting as well, but that may just be me. Maybe it is just too straight forward?

I guess I will have to just find a way to go on.

28 comments:

John Hinderliter said...

Who can figure show jurors? I sold six paintings this week from various galleries and have yet to get a painting into our big annual show.

Jeremy Elder said...

This has such a serene feel to it - very calming. I really like the composition of the large and small doors standing side by side.

Anonymous said...

my goodness. this is lovely.

thank you for sharing. i had (another) painting rejected from a show last week. seeing this beautiful painting makes me feel better about my own, because i can say with all certainty that your beautiful reject is in fact an Excellent Painting.

~lorna

Giovanni Pasini said...

such a shame!
in my opinion is a great painting!
nice composition,well done and of transmit a soft but typical venetian feeling!

Lash LeRoux said...

Who knows what goes on in the mind of such critics. Perhaps the painting isn't "bold" enough, or doesn't really make you "think". Regardless, I agree with your assessment. I think the composition is wonderful. The values are so subtle that the painting draws you in and you feel relaxed. Sure, these could be the same reasons why the "powers that be" didn't choose to include your painting in their show. However, I think these same elements are what would make this a very successful painting commercially. Most people are not looking for bold statements to hang in their home or office. They are looking for a serene and calming piece such as this. I really think you could sell a lot of prints of this painting.

Oscar Pacquing Jr. said...

Quick question: I noticed that in all of your works there's a copyright that appears below, how do you do that? I thought that is a neat thing to protect your precious works from copy-ers and authenticate artworks. I love them works, btw. Thanks for posting them.

Rob Rey said...

Looks like a nice one to me. I've had similar luck with competitions so far. I've lost all expectation for any of them, just have to keep on.

Jake Wyatt said...

Fabulous. Venice was the first thing I thought of when I saw it.

Lauren Moyer said...

They're just afraid of it's splendor. ;)

Anonymous said...

Many of those we honor today would not have gotten in shows had they had them 'back when.' I don't know who started juried shows, and who decided since their conception that artists need a list of shows on their resume to validate their worth, I think it is a rediculous concept. We've all been to enough shows to see a masterful piece overlooked and a blue ribbon on something half its value.

ken said...

I remember when i was in art school one of the greatest lessons I learned was how to be subtle. This was a good lesson as I came from a comic book background and I was always drawing in your face kinda art. It's a great achievement in art to be able to pull back and not smack the viewer in the face. There is also another lesson to be learned; that being subtle and being boring are not the same thing. While I personally like this piece, I can see why some wouldn't; its so subtle and somber it almost hurts. I have your blog in my favorites section because I admire your technique, but honestly not much else. Of all the artists I enjoy your work honestly is not the first i would run out and buy, or save on my desktop for that matter. I think you said it best when you said "too straight forward?" Artist like Kent Williams, Audrey Kawasaki, even David Leffel do portraits, but there is style to them, something that makes you take notice. Something we forget along our artistic journey is to be creative. We concentrate so much on technique we forget the moments of going nuts with markers for hours. We forget about doodling in the margins of our notebooks. We forget that we learned technique in the first place so we could draw some really cool shit. Only our imaginations limit us to what we can put on the paper or canvas or computer, our hands will always do fine. You can be the best chef in the world but if you keep making eggs and toast there would seem to be no point in being so damn talented. Some people want to think when looking at art, others want to be smashed in the face, I just want to look at a painting and go "that's f@!#$ sweet". While this painting shows masterful technique it's essentially a gray scale painting of doors and water. Most casual viewers and artists alike see this and go "big deal". I know I may come off like some cocky critic who's so brave behind his keyboard but I really say this in all respect. Just think about it, why did you paint this? With all the talent and energy surging through you, why did you decide on this scene? Why not just look at the photo you used? Why just plagiarize nature, when you can create your own worlds? Why just paint with technique when you can add style? Maybe this is your thing, you are a realist and a portrait artist, and I'm just an opinionated butthole. But what if you broaden you artistic horizons? Push yourself further? With your ability I could see you easily doing some mind blowing work. Get deep, get religious, get sexual, get crazy, get surreal, get violent...Blow our minds Mr. Malan! Make James Jean look like a hack.

Guillermo P. Mogorrón said...

People reject the works of others without much remorse, and I can sound bitter, but they usually have a incredible lack of respect for the work of an artist. I had to face many people changing things in my work and I accept it, but I wont pretend I like it, or that I understand it. In this world there are lots of untalented people who thinks money gives reason.
This work of yours is superb, I wish I had the talent to do such a composition, and keep it so interesting as you made with so few range of colours and the wise use of space. If I had money on me, I would buy this one without doubt.

Tina said...

Fahgettaboutit - you are Brilliant Anyway. ;-)

Jason Seiler said...

Hey Dave, this is a beautiful painting . . . I'm not sure what kind of show it was, but if I were you, I wouldn't take it personal. Your work is very, very good . . . I've entered many shows and I've only made it into a few. Later you see the work that was accepted and you realize it's not about the work. Every judge is different . . . current illustration these days looks a lot like kids are drawing everything . . . next year realism might be back? Who knows? Your work is great, you've got massive talent bro!

Big Sam said...

Breathtaking sir! Love your work!

Deb Schmit said...

Hi David,
You've probably had all the critique on this painting you can stand...but, just one more?

I find this painting to be well rendered but the composition to me is quite uncomfortable. Why? Probably because its breaking a few basic rules that in this case, don't seem to work.
To convey a feeling of serenity to this scene, the large door should be on the left. (as in reading left to right) This would perhaps give the eye an easier path to follow. Also, the large door combined with that dark cement shape in the lower right foreground, seems too heavy. It'd be great to see one of your lovely figures on the left, just to "weigh" it down some.
For me I'd put some emotional weight to the figure as well. Like maybe a laboring peasant or...?

Overall though, I LOVE your rendering style and think the painting is beautiful. Your blog is always one of my top favorites to visit throughout the week. Thanks for inspiring!

Daniel Bejarano Casarino said...

This is a wonderful painting to me, and you have a great talent so keep going and inspiring us!

Robin Goodfellow said...

incredible! you're right, the composition is beautiful, the contrast in value and size is absolutely eyepopping. Is it for sale?

Robin Goodfellow said...

or can i at least use it on my blog to highlight an article?

Tom Scholes said...

*shrugs* I love this painting dude.

Direndra Kumar Pal said...

superb painting...!!!"

Heather Dixon said...

This is beautiful. There's a story (I think it's called Water Mirror) it reminds me of. It takes place in an alternate-Venice, and these two characters are in a darkened water-street in Venice, where there's no light in the windows. When they look in the reflection in the water, the windows are lit. Anyways, that just kind of struck me, a lot like this painting did.

Kloosli said...

Excellent. When I come into some money I will have to buy it from you.

Greg said...

Wow! I'd really like to see this Ken guy's work (see comment from June 23) and see how "creative" it is! I sure don't see this painting (or your other work) as "technique" and boring plagiarizing of nature. I also don't look at your other paintings and say "big deal"!
I do agree with him in that I think "comes off like some cocky critic who's so brave behind his keyboard". Anyway...I really like your painting!

David Malan said...

Thanks Greg, I am glad to hear it. I have a split personality with my own work, half of me sees nothing but problems, which is a good motivator keeps me working to get better. The other half likes these subjects which is why I paint them.
I am not easily offended though and find the critiques as useful as the compliments.
Thanks again.

Heidi said...

Serene?? Sorry but I think the drama of this painting has been overlooked. I don't see this as a nice calm Venice-above-the-sofa painting. I see this as a very emotional piece. The uncomfortable compostition. The somber palette and ominous dark shapes. Who of us has never felt like this poor little plain door standing next to some big fabulous personality. Who has never felt inadequate when looking at glamor magazine models and millionaire moguls? But this painting allows us to look at it from the outside. We don't dislike the little door for being plain. We don't judge it. We just want to know what's inside. That's what counts. In everyone.

David Malan said...

Thanks very much, Heidi. I haven't fleshed out that much about my story but I have similar feelings about the subtle tension that allows much to be read into the composition.
I like your sculpture work, someday I hope to get some clay and do some of my own.

Andy Dolphin said...

I know I'm late to the party but I only discovered your blog last night and am slowly working backwards through it.

Amazing stuff! Thanks. I began messing with digital painting in Photoshop a few weeks back, as a means to try out ideas and solve problems before putting oil on board. You've got me inspired to try caricature all over again - starting with a self portrait.

On the issue of "boring paintings", I figure that if you like it then those who think it's boring are not looking deep enough. They're not getting past the obvious.

At least, that's the excuse I use when people who push wild abstracts dismissing realism as "shallow".