Wednesday, January 21, 2009

Underdrawing - step #2

Step one was the original drawing.
I said in the drawing stage that I would post pictures along the process, but that is a lot of pressure that demands a competent painting. I admit I held off until I could see I would be more or less satisfied withe the result. Another problem with posting my process is that I don't have a set process it changes a lot as I learn. Unfortunately oil painting is only a side job and I don't have enough experience to have a set method.
So here is the underdrawing. It is a new method that I haven't used before but I do like, quick linework then a lot of really loose charcoal scrubbed around with the back of my hand to get a simple value study.
Stay tuned...

16 comments:

TSL said...

Staying tuned, David. BTW - I am not certain if you changed the background color on your blog, but like it. Your work just jumps from the page.

Shannon said...

Saw your work in American Art Collector - Congrats and good luck on the upcoming show at Legacy.

marybullock2 said...

Dave - so glad you are posting your process. I like this sketch just like it is - it could stand as a finished painting. Love it!
Mary
The Figurative Realm of Mary Bullock

Thierry said...

This sketch is already excellent for itself! Now, I'm impatient to see the continuation…

Yeruza said...

great sketch!!!

Brian Busch said...

Great start, how are you fixing the charcoal, (or are you) so the oils don't mix? Question about a painting on your site, is that a painting of Silverman in his studio?

Jason Seiler said...

Looking great, can't wait to see your painting!

Sergio Melero said...

Nice expression, I love this drawing!!

David Malan said...

Thanks guys, Brian the drawing is fixed with crystal clear. And yes thats Burt's studio, my wife worked for him a few years ago so he likes her and I got to visit once.

Brian Busch said...

Thanx Dave, Silverman is a big hero of mine, and that painting of him is great by the way. You could easily see Silverman's influence on my watercolors if you want at www.brianbuschstudio.com. Keep up the great work, I am real fond of your personal work.

Kevin Keele said...

Very moody. I like it.

CárcamO said...

Teus desenhos são absolutamente fantásticos.Congratulations!!
abs

Deb Schmit said...

David,
This is so interesting to see the process.
I'm curious though, why not skip the charcoal stage and go right to a value study with a wash of turps and a neutral oil. I use raw umber or a mix of burnt umber and ultramarine blue. You can push it around all you like until you find the best comp. Since it usually dries overnight, you can start laying in the color the next day. Or if you're impatient like me and don't mind playing in the mud, jump right in!
Sorry, hope this isn't ruining the zen. I see lots of artists draw things in as you have done, so it could be that I'm just lazy.

David Malan said...

Thanks all,
Brian, I do see the Silverman influence, looks great.
Deb, This is a newer process sometimes I do the burnt umber underpainting but I guess it is faster to just get the basic values then get into the full color painting. I get excited about painting and just hurry all the steps to get started when I like an idea. But this process is constantly evolving.

Anonymous said...

how do you establish the original image? transfer the drawing or...jump into it with pencil....
Curious.

David Malan said...

sometimes I just draw it this time and probably half the time it is done with transfer paper.